SCHOOL HOSTS WORKSHOP FOR PEKING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

9/23/2016

Visitors learned about Georgia Tech’s research on air quality, climate, and more.

The School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS) hosted a workshop for a delegation from Peking University (PKU) on Aug. 9-12, 2016. The workshop exposed PKU undergraduate students to Georgia Tech’s cutting-edge research on air and water quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate, while also giving them an international experience. Faculty from EAS, the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (ChBE) presented several research topics to the PKU visitors. These topics covered innovative wastewater treatment technology, measurement and modeling the climate impacts of aerosols, and measurement of trace gases and aerosol chemical composition.

Throughout the week, faculty members highlighted the environmental concerns in their respective fields and discussed fundamental laboratory studies, while emphasizing that research has no boundaries besides those we set for ourselves. PKU students also visited a research site outside of Atlanta where EAS faculty are studying how ammonia emissions impact the fundamental chemical properties of aerosols. The students were able to see the first stage of an experiment being set up to conduct a large air-quality study that utilizes research-grade instrumentation and monitoring equipment.

After four days of meeting with Tech faculty and graduate students, PKU students gave presentations back to the atmospheric research groups. The students shared highlights of their experiences at Tech, what they learned about their specific research interests, and how this trip will impact their decisions regarding graduate school.  

Greg Huey, professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and chair of EAS, expressed enthusiasm about this visit. “I hope to keep developing the long standing relationship between PKU and Georgia Tech with an eye towards creating a joint degree program,” Huey says. “I’d also like us to continue applying Georgia Tech expertise in air and water quality towards addressing environmental challenges in China. We see this as a method in helping to train future leaders in solving environmental problems.”

Sally Ng, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, remarked on how inquisitive and out-spoken the Chinese students were.  “They asked excellent questions and truly wanted to understand the materials,” she says.

PKU students found their environmental science research experience engaging and will use it as a way to distinguish themselves from their peers should they choose to apply to graduate school at Tech.

EAS hopes the visit will encourage Chinese students to apply for graduate school at Tech and become part of our internationally recognized program in air quality.