Graduate Courses

EAS8803 Mineral Surface Geochemistry
Hours - Total:
3.00
Hours - Lecture:
3.00
Hours - Lab:
0.00
Syllabus:

Interactions of aqueous solutions with the surface of minerals and particles with emphasis on molecular and thermodynamic models of ion sorption in complexation reactions, crystal growth and dissolution processes in Earth environments.

EAS8803 Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Hours - Total:
3
Research Topics:
Paleoclimate
EAS8803 Modern Geodetic Methods
Hours - Total:
3.00
Hours - Lecture:
3.00
Research Topics:
Geophysics

This course is to be a combination of lecture, discussion, and computer-based usage of many of the modern tools applied to determining and understanding ground surface deformation.

EAS8803 Ocean Dynamics
Hours - Total:
3.00
Hours - Lecture:
3.00
Hours - Lab:
0.00
Syllabus:
Web Page:

An advanced class for graduate students in Oceanography and Climate Science that studies the basic equations governing rotating geophysical flows with application to the ocean circulation. This course includes a theoretical component on geophysical fluid dynamics and one involving a combination of observations, theory and numerical modeling relevant to understand the large scale ocean circulation.

EAS8803 Earthquake Physics
Hours - Total:
3.00
Hours - Lecture:
3.00
Research Topics:
Geophysics

This course consists of a series of graduate-level lectures, discussion and presentations of the current status of geophysical and mechanical understanding of processes that control earthquakes.

EAS8803 Origin of Planetary Systems
Hours - Total:
3.00
Hours - Lecture:
3.00
Research Topics:
Space & Planetary Science

We will discuss the fundamental concepts pertinent to the evolution of planets and planetary systems.  We will cover topics to include (but not limited to): physics and chemistry of protoplanetary disks, planet formation, planetary system architecture, physics and chemistry of planetary differentiation, the meteorite record, asteroids, comets, Kuiper Belt and Oort cloud objects, and the early evolution of habitable planets.  We will draw on evidence from our own solar system and consider these processes in the light of new observations of exoplanets and other star systems.  An independent research component will be included.

EAS8803 Atmospheric Radiative Transfer
Hours - Total:
3.00
Hours - Lecture:
3.00
Hours - Lab:
0.00

The atmospheric radiative transfer is central to understanding the workings of the climate system. This course covers the physical principles, quantitative analysis, and numerical modeling of atmospheric radiation and its interaction with atmospheric constituents (gases, aerosol, and clouds) and the surface. Topics to be covered include the radiative balance at the surface, radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere, radiative heating/cooling rates, actinic fluxes, methods for solving the one- and three-dimensional radiative transfer, radiation codes in regional and global atmospheric dynamical models, among others.

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